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Ruben Kostucki

Religion or Humans - which is the problem?

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10 Nov 2008

I would be tempted to say: No Religions, they have created more death, violence, crimes and genocides than they create any good in our planet.

But I am actually wondering whether without Religion, human beings would have anyway been through all of that for all the already exisitng reasons:
power, nationalism, money and the economy, conflict of interest etc.

So I simply believe if we don't have religions on OFP humans might find other reasons to fight (not that I believe in the bad side of human nature)...the question stays largely open then!!

Comments

  • I think I agree - religion is one way of humans expressing themselves for both good and bad; without it humans would find another way of expressing themselves. It's up to us to decide how much good and how much bad we want to express.

    If our sole aim was peace we would create a peaceful religion (or set of religions). At the moment our sole aim isn't peace, so our religions aren't peaceful either. I think they aren't a cause of disharmony, they're just a mirror of ourselves and our attitudes.

    Written by Sam Harvey on 11 Nov 2008, at 09:42 Report this comment

  • Consider this:

    Religion is an insult to human dignity. With or without it, you'd have good people doing good things and evil people doing bad things, but for good people to do bad things, it takes religion. ~ Steven Weinberg, Nobel Laureate in physics

    Religion is a divisive force and it inspires parochialism and hatred. Under what circumstances can you imagine a person being motivated to commit mass-murder/suicide by strapping explosives to themselves and detonating them in a crowd? Without a Jihad mandated by the 'one true god' and an afterlife with 72 virgins, how else might a person be tempted to commit such an atrocity.

    Once a person accepts the premise that after they die in this life, they will live in Utopian bliss for eternity in the next, they can no longer be relied upon to act rationally and act with self preserving interests.

    Having said that, I don't think it is possible to make a conscious choice about whether or not to 'have' religion in the future, it is still a personal choice. It's like trying to decide whether people in the future should be vegan, they are going to want to decide that for themselves on an individual basis. Wouldn't any regimen which attempted to make veganism or atheism compulsory, be considered a fascist, totalitarian regimen?

    If you want to eliminate religion, it is best to teach reason and thinking skills. Indoctrinating children however and identifying them by the beliefs of their parents, should definitely be jumped on from a great height. Religion is not a birthright, it is an imposition that people sometimes impose upon their children, which often saddles them with dogmatic prejudice from the cradle to the grave. Oh how I do so sincerely hope, for a future in which everybody lays down their weapons and their dogma.

    Written by Steve on 23 Jan 2009, at 11:27 Report this comment

  • Steve, thanks for your answer to my proposal first of all!

    I'd like to know what would be a concrete idea for the future of our planet to fight indoctrination and education without reason and thinking skills?

    I believe in the UK this isn't too bad, with an increasing atheist population, as our education systems is rather open for free thinking and reasoning (not perfect I will admit, but better than other places). But what about other countries, from the middle east to China? what's the solution out there?

    Written by Ruben Kostucki on 26 Jan 2009, at 17:32 Report this comment

  • Well, there are many other reasons to fight besides religion, yes many wars were fought for religion. But there was also land acquisition - in ancient times, the Persians, Greeks, and Romans; in early America, the French and Indian War, the War of 1812, the Napoleonic wars; recent, the Russian Invasion of Georgia - and for freedom - the American Revolution, the French Revolution, the Native American Revolts, the American Civil War, The Texas Revolution - and for oil - The many wars in the Middle East, and the Current War in Iraq (which actually has two reasons, terrorism and oil) - Racial Supremacy, WWII - and for politics - the American Civil War, the Rise and Fall of Communism in Russia, The Rise of Communism in China. So you see there were many wars that were fought for reasons other than religion, so even if there was no religion, there would still be wars. It is just in human nature to fight, we are blood thirsty beings. I heard once on a TV show that "when man first came out of his cave and met another man from a different cave that had a different language and a different way of looking at the world, it was his dream to kill that man so he wouldn't have to learn his language or understand his way of looking at the world" and I know it was just a comedic show, but that quote makes sense.

    Written by Michael D'Augustine on 27 Jan 2009, at 23:14 Report this comment

  • I don't think religions are the problem; in fact, I believe they can be a significant part of the solution... IF we as adherents of religions more full time *live* by the teachings (e.g. Abrahamic faiths have excellent role models for living simply, avoid greed, live sustainably with *all* species etc) instead of abuse them for our personal advantages.... My 2p. In peace, Rianne

    Written by Rianne C. ten Veen on 07 Jan 2012, at 21:44 Report this comment


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