• Sign up
Connect with Facebook

Animals/Wildlife

  • save sparrows!

    sparrows live arround our houses making noisy sounds and fliying in search of food. but they are dissapearing.

    Written by lakshman rupanagunta on 28 Mar 2012, at 10:17 (0 Comments) read proposal
  • Olive Ridley Sea Turtles are struggling to Survive

    Right to life. Unfortunately the Olive Ridley Sea Turtles are fighting for their lives in the Odisha coast, India. Together we can prevent this suffering. Now it’s a race against time, as mortality of Olive Ridleys is worst along the coast of Odisha; with highly unsustainable fishing effort and habitat destruction, these beautiful species are on the verge of extinction.

    This species is especially known for its mass nesting or arribada when several thousands of turtles migrate to the breeding ground to mate and nest. The Gahirmatha, Rushikullya and Devi river mouth of Odisha state is well known for world’s largest Olive Ridley sea turtle rookery. The Olive Ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys Olivacea), which nests along the Odisha coast, is highly endangered today. This species is especially known for its mass nesting or arribada when several thousands of turtles migrate to the breeding ground to mate and nest simultaneously. Although mass nesting or arribada takes place in three sites, the adjacent beaches of these places also contribute greatly through sporadic nesting of sea turtles. Olive Ridley Sea Turtles in Odisha represents about 50 % of its world population and 90% of sea turtles along the India coast comes to Odisha coasts for nesting. The large-scale mortality of adult turtles every year in Odisha coast recorded during the study is a matter of utmost concern and need to be addressed immediately. Incidental mortality of Olive Ridleys is worst along the coast of Odisha; with arribada Olive Ridleys gathering to nest were unsustainable fishing effort is high. Since last 10 years, thousands or tens of thousands of Olive Ridleys have stranded dead on the Odisha beaches, presumably as a result of incidental capture in shrimp trawls. Apart from fishing related mortality, turtles face multifarious problems while they are in the coastal waters of Odisha. The polluted beaches make unsuitable for turtles to nests, the high predation by feral animals are hindrance in the recruitment of offspring and moreover, the anthropogenic activities are harmful for habitat and breeding of turtles. To counter the high mortality rate (to predators) and low survival rate (one in a thousand), these gentle creatures have been pushed towards the brink of extinction.

    Written by Bijaya Kumar Kabi on 16 Dec 2011, at 06:13 (0 Comments) read proposal
  • The Future of Marine Wildlife

    Over-fishing, pollution and climate change are the greatest dangers to the world's oceans

    Written by Maxine Fay Miller on 04 Feb 2009, at 14:23 (0 Comments) read proposal
  • The Future for Birds

    Last year, swallows stayed in Britain when they should have been migrating, this year, Bewick’s swans arrived several weeks late at the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust’s Slimbridge Wetland Centre. The swans stayed in Siberia for longer than usual as enhanced global warming and the resulting change in climate encouraged them to stay in their warmer environs at home rather than migrate to Britain.

    Written by Maxine Fay Miller on 19 Nov 2008, at 12:41 (1 Comment) read proposal